• Play the game
  • Raise your voice against open defecation
  • Play the game
  • Raise your voice against open defecation
  • Play the game
  • Raise your voice against open defecation
Enough of this sh*t
Raise your voice against open defecation

Why Take Poo To The Loo?

Close to 594 million which is 48 percent of population in India practices open defecation. That's half the population dumping over 65 million kilos of poo out there every day. If this poo continues to be let loose on us, there will be no escaping the stench of life threatening infections, diseases and epidemics.

It's time to take the poo to the loo.

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Facts and stats
  • The total weight of excreta being open defecated daily in India is 65 million kg per day. That’s a whole lot of crap!

  • Almost 28 million school children across India do not have access to school toilet facilities.

  • Globally, India has the largest number of people, close to 594 million which is 48 percent of population in India practices open defecation. About half the population of India use toilets.

  • With 44 percent of mothers disposing their children’s faeces in the open, there is a very high risk of microbial contamination (bacteria, viruses, amoeba) of water which causes diarrhoea in children

  • Although access to sanitation in rural India is improving, the increase is not equitable. Open defecation is still almost universal among the poorest 20% of the population

  • Women and girls face shame and a loss of personal dignity and safety risk if there is no toilet at home. They have to wait for the night to relieve themselves to avoid being seen by others.

  • There has been good progress in providing toilet and handwashing facilities in schools in India.

  • Adequate, well-maintained water supply and sanitation facilities in schools encourage children to attend school regularly and help them achieve their educational goals.

  • Inadequate water supply and sanitation in schools are health hazards and affect school attendance, retention and educational performance.

  • Although access to improved sanitation is steadily increasing in India, the use of improved sanitation in the country remains an enormous challenge.

  • Inadequate water supply and sanitation in schools are health hazards and affect school attendance, retention and educational performance.

  • 7 states in India (Orissa, Meghalaya, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Assam, Uttar Pradesh and Bihar) account for almost 50% (13.8 million) children without access to toilet facilities in schools.

  • India, at the current rate of progress will only achieve the sanitation target of MDG 7–c in 2054.

  • Water safety is being compromised by open defecation as faeces in the open contaminate drinking water in family and community wells.

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